Yesterday, Today, & FOREVER The King of Pop

Judge dismisses promoters’ lawsuit against Jackson

NEW YORK — A federal judge on Thursday dismissed a
multimillion-dollar lawsuit by a concert promoter against the late
Michael Jackson over a failed reunion concert.

U.S. District
Judge Harold Baer Jr. granted a motion by lawyers for Jackson’s estate
to dismiss the case, citing a lack of evidence that the late King of
Pop or his family were under a binding agreement to perform at a
reunion concert.

AllGood Entertainment Inc., a company started in
Morristown, N.J., sued Jackson for $40 million on June 10, 2009,
roughly two weeks before the singer’s death in Los Angeles at age 50.
It claimed Jackson and his then-manager broke a contract for a Jackson
reunion show.

AllGood later filed a creditor’s claim with
Jackson’s estate, claiming the potential value of the lawsuit was at
least $300 million.

Baer determined that there was a letter of
intent between Jackson’s then-manager, Frank DiLeo, and AllGood, but
never an enforceable contract. He noted that neither Jackson nor any
other members of the family who were to be involved in the show ever
signed a contract.

Attorneys for Jackson’s estate and DiLeo
contended that if there was a breach in the contract, AllGood broke the
agreement first because it did not issue a payment to Jackson before a
required deadline. Baer wrote that there was no evidence that AllGood
suffered substantial economic damage because of the failed concert.

“This
case never had any merit and the claim was frivolous from day one,”
Jackson estate attorney Howard Weitzman said in a statement. “Michael Jackson never agreed to participate in a concert promoted by AllGood as
the judge clearly found in his opinion.”

An after-hours phone message left for AllGood’s attorney, Ira Meyerowitz, was not immediately returned.

AP

Earlier this year, a federal judge in Washington rejected a suit by former Michael Jackson publicist Raymone Bain, who claimed that she was cheated out of
$44 million in commisions on business deals she helped arranged for the
late King of Pop.

Politico

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